Bill Kendrick's Entries
for the NOMAM 2019
BASIC 10-Liner Contest

Here are the games and an app that I developed for the 2019 "BASIC 10-liners" contest, for the 2019 NOMAM (Not Only Marvelous Atari Machines) retrocomputing meeting in Germany. (See the contest rules.)

All programs are written in Turbo BASIC XL, with standard (120-character) logical line lengths. (Suitable for the "Pur-120" category; at least the games are. Non-games land in the "Wild" contest category.)


Missile10 — a "Missile Command"-style game

About the program

Screenshot of Missle10 Gameplay Screenshot of Missle10 Game Over screen

This is a very simple "Missile Command"-style game, played by one player, with a joystick controller.

Use the joystick to move the targetter, and press Fire to cause an anti-missile explosion. Any incoming missiles that hit an explosion will explode themselves, which can cause a chain reaction.

You receive one point for each missile destroyed. Your score appears in the blue area at the bottom.

When missiles reach the bottom (blue) area of the screen, they'll damage your base/cities/ego. The blue are will get increasingly dark as it's hit. After the 7th hit, the game ends.

Gameplay begins immediately. Use the BASIC "RUN" command to start over after the game end.

Download

How the code works

Line 10

Line 20

(Oops, there's no line 30)

LINE 40

Line 50

Line 60

Line 70

Line 80

Line 90

Line 1000 - Explosion-creation subroutine

Line 2000 - Score subroutine


Amen [BREAK] — plays the "Amen Break" in a loop

About the program


Watch it on YouTube

This plays the famous "Amen Break" drum beat, as sampled or utilized in literally thousands of songs, from the theme to Futurama and The Powerpuff Girls, to NWA's Straight Outta Compton, and countless Drum and Bass songs.

From Wikipedia,

The Amen break is a 6- to 7-second (4-bar) drum solo performed by Gregory Sylvester "G. C." Coleman in the song "Amen, Brother" performed by the 1960s funk and soul outfit the Winstons. The full song is an up-tempo instrumental rendition of Jester Hairston's "Amen", which he wrote for the Sidney Poitier film Lilies of the Field (1963) and which was subsequently popularized by the Impressions in 1964. The Winstons' version was released as a B-side of the 45 RPM 7-inch vinyl single "Color Him Father" in 1969 on Metromedia (MMS-117), and is currently available on several compilations and on a 12-inch vinyl re-release together with other songs by The Winstons.

Learn more at Wikipedia. Hat-tip to Elephant Drums, a drum lesson company in the UK, which posted about the Amen Break, including drum tabs that I used to slap together this program.

This program allows you to choose a tempo (from 1=slowest, to 7=fastest), and how many of the four bars to play (1 and 2 are identical; it seems weird to play three, so really only "1" or "4" make sense here).

A medium speed, and all four bars, are the default, if you just hit [Return]. (Via BASIC "TRAP" command skipping ahead.)

Press [Break] or [Reset], and use the BASIC "RUN" command to start over.

Download

How the code works

Line 10

Line 15

Line 20

Line 30

Line 40

Line 50

Line 60

Line 70

(No line 80)

Line 90


Back to New Breed Software | bill@newbreedsoftware.com